Tag Archives: Vermont

Travel: Stowe, Vermont

 

Stowe gets an average of 333 inches of natural snow each year. But it's become a true four-seasons resort, and is especially gorgeous in the fall. Uploaded by worldtravelattractions.com.

Sometimes you have to chuckle at the writers on Wikipedia. Take this entry about one of the premier ski destinations in New England: “Tourism is a significant industry.” Really, Wikipedia?

Uploaded by grandslamtennistours.com.

The resort’s main attraction is Mount Mansfield, which at 4,393 feet is the tallest in Vermont. The first ski trails were cut by the CCC during the Great Depression, and as no one ever said, “If you cut it down, they will come.” They come for the 116 runs and the 333 inches average of annual snowfall.

But Stowe, like most full-service resorts these days, offers a lot more than skiing. First there’s the beauty of this quintessential Vermont small town. There’s shopping, more fine restaurants than anywhere in New England outside of Boston and Providence, year-round outdoor sports like fishing and kayaking, and of course the gorgeous New England autumn (Great American Things, October 19, 2009). It’s a year-round destination for anyone, but a winter paradise for those who love going down the side of a mountain on two sticks.

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Travel: Vermont Route 100

 

Vermont Route 100 goes north-south from the state's border with Canada to its border with Massachusetts. You can see fall foliage, great ski resorts, and Ben and Jerry's factory. Uploaded by yankeefoliage.com.

 

Route 100 in Vermont is one of America’s most scenic highways. Especially during autumn, when the maples are bursting into bright shades of orange and gold.

 

Uploaded by media1.px.yelpcdn.com.

 

The highway runs north and south, all the way from the Canadian border down to the Massachusetts border. It winds through the mountains, offering plenty of breathtaking vistas along the way. If the weather is cold enough, you can stop and ski at a number of New England’s best resorts, including Stowe, Killington, and Sugarbush. Or you can visit the Vermont Country Store in Weston, or take a tour of Ben and Jerry’s ice cream factory in Waterbury.

You can drive its entire 216-mile length in one day. But with all there is to see and do along the way, why would you?

 

Uploaded by yankeefoliage.com.

 

 

Uploaded by danandsally.com.

 

 

Uploaded by innatclearwaterpond.com.

 

 

Uploaded by startours.com.

 

Food: Vermont Maple Syrup

It takes 40 gallons of sap from the maple tree to make one gallon of syrup. Even so, Vermont produces 920,000 gallons of the yummy stuff each year. Photo by Stephen Hamilton, uploaded by foodporndaily.com.

It’s a Saturday morning, and you’ve awakened with visions of pancakes in your head. Doesn’t take that long to prepare the batter, doesn’t take long to cook, and then comes the best part – butter and syrup. That’s right, I said butter. Your body can take one pat of butter a week, you won’t die. The national brands are fine, but nothing beats the taste and richness of pure Vermont maple syrup.

Uploaded by igourmet.com.

Syrup is produced in other places in the USA and in Canada, but there’s something about the climate in Vermont that has made its product the golden standard. First, the maple trees are there. Seems silly, but it takes 30-50 years for a tree to grow the height necessary to produce enough sap. Then, it takes about 40 gallons of sap to produce one gallon of syrup. Makes you appreciate those pancakes more now, doesn’t it?

Even so, Vermont produces 920,000 gallons of the stuff a year – more than twice as much as the next largest state (Maine). So enjoy your syrup, enjoy your pancakes, and give a mental tip of the hat to the farmers up in Vermont. They’ve certainly earned it.

Travel: New England in Autumn

There's nothing like autumn in New England. Uploaded to Flickr by krisfong.

There's nothing like autumn in New England. Uploaded to Flickr by krisfong.

I don’t know why there needs to be much explanation of this, except to say that there are lots of places that are beautiful in the fall. But the classic New England mountains and lakes framed by the changing leaves are simply magical. The pictures tell the story.

Uploaded to Flickr by Kirpernicus.

Uploaded to Flickr by Kirpernicus.

Uploaded by seasons.flyingdreams.org.

Uploaded by seasons.flyingdreams.org.

Uploaded by rickbakerimages.com.

Uploaded by rickbakerimages.com.

Uploaded by easternslopeinn.com.

Uploaded by easternslopeinn.com.

Uploaded by techelectronicsstl.com.

Uploaded by techelectronicsstl.com.

Uploaded by mikelevin.com.

Uploaded by mikelevin.com.

Uploaded by tyestravel.com.

Uploaded by tyestravel.com.