Tag Archives: Katherine Paterson

Kid Stuff: Bridge to Terabithia

 

Bridge to Terabithia won the Newberry Medal for children's literature in 1978. It was made into a feature film in 2007. Uploaded by reelingreviews.com.

I read lots of great children’s stories to my boys when they were growing up. Made up quite a few, too. I don’t know if they remember them after all these years (Guys?), but I remember Bridge to Terabithia best because it’s the one that got to me as I read it.

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I don’t want to spoil the plot if you haven’t read it, so I won’t do much of a  summary. The story revolves around a boy and girl, friends and neighbors who are both very creative and enjoy fantasy stories. So they create a “magical kingdom” which they name Terabithia, in which the boy (Jess) is king, and the girl (Leslie) is queen. Let’s just say that a tragedy occurs, and that’s where I broke up. After all these years, I still remember that moment.

Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson is a beautiful book that won the 1978 Newberry Medal for children’s literature. Paterson, a Christian, was asked whether her faith influenced her writing. She answered, “C.S. Lewis said that the book can’t be what the writer is not, and I think you write out of who you are.  In fiction, you don’t start out to teach a lesson (because that’s propaganda, that’s not fiction), you start out to tell a story.  What you believe deeply will come out and the story will reveal you, whether you mean for it to or not!”

The Arts: The National Book Festival

About 75 authors and more than 100,000 book lovers will converge on the National Mall later this month in a celebration of the written word. Uploaded by theepochtimes.com.

It’s a book lover’s paradise. Held each fall on the National Mall in Washington, the National Book Festival brings over 100,000 fans together with dozens of noted authors in a weekend celebration of the written word.

Sponsored by the Library of Congress, 2010 is the Festival’s 10th anniversary. There are special sections devoted to children’s books, popular fiction/mystery, contemporary life, history/biography, poetry/prose, and teens and children. Among the more notable authors attending are Jules Feiffer, Isabel Allende, Ken Follett, Diana Gabaldon, Martha Grimes, Karin Slaughter, Peter Straub, Scott Turow, Jonathan Franzen, Brad Meltzer, and Katherine Paterson.

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Among the activities at the Festival are interviews, readings, signings, and lectures. And, as you might expect, lots of reading-related programs throughout the weekend to entertain children and families.

This year’s festival is Saturday, September 25. If you’re a reader living anywhere near D.C., this is an opportunity you shouldn’t let pass you by.

Here’s an interesting presentation from last year’s Festival by one of my wife’s favorite authors, Nicholas Sparks: